Recently, I’ve been really liking popcorn.

To be honest,  I was never a popcorn fan.

Why did this change?  Well, my husband, the farmer, has been selling his greens at a local food market called Farm Fresh Picks at the Creamery.  You order online through their Facebook group and it’s a drive through pick-up on Saturday.  If you live around Enumclaw, WA., check it out!

In the group was a local Kettle Corn producer.  I wanted to try something different from the market.  And I thought, “hey, why not popcorn?  I haven’t had popcorn in ages!”  When I saw their list, I was amazed.  Who knew there were so many flavors.  They had chocolate covered sweet popcorn to the savory cheesy flavors.   Since I lean toward savory more than sweet I ordered the Creamy Dill, white cheddar, Chicago, Chicago fire and ranch.  As it turned out, my favorite is Chicago!  Chicago is sweet caramel corn mixed with cheddar cheese.  It’s the perfect combination for me when I want a little sweetness.

One day I was craving popcorn.  And I thought about what Asian flavors can we bring to popcorn.  Then I remembered the Hawaiian Hurricane Popcorn.  At the movie theatres in Hawaii, of course they sell the standard buttered popcorn but they also sell packets of arare, or rice crackers.  Only in Hawaii right?  What the local people like to do is to mix the two together.  It’s that salty, crunchy, buttery and soy flavor mixed into one!  Yum!

Using that as inspiration, a company came up with the Hurricane popcorn, which is essentially, buttered popcorn with furikake and arare, rice crackers.  Furikake is a Japanese condiment sprinkled on rice.  

So, that was my new challenge.  I haven’t made popcorn in years.  And if I did, I’d just buy the microwavable kind.  But, now that I’m trying to be more health conscious, I make an effort to stay away from preservatives as much as possible. 

 

My first attempt at popcorn on the stove, using kernels, was a complete disaster.  I burnt them all…How could I burn them?  I put in too many kernels in the pot at one time.  Big mistake.  I found that popping about ⅓ cup at a time is best because it ensures complete popping of all the kernels.

Second time around, they came out great.  All the corn popped!

Here’s the recipe.  I didn’t add the arare this time.  But, you can add it at any time.  The tip is to add and mix just before eating the popcorn.  It keeps everything much more crunchy.  And it’s that crunch that we all crave, right?

Hawaiian Style Popcorn - Hurricane Popcorn Recipe
 
Author:
Recipe type: snack
Serves: 1 big bowl
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
 
Popcorn with Asian Flavors using butter and furikake
Ingredients
  • ⅓ cup corn kernels
  • 2T vegetable oil
  • furikake - ¼ cup or to your liking
  • arare - rice crackers
  • 3T butter - more if desired
Instructions
  1. In a big pot, add 2 T vegetable oil and several kernels of corn
  2. Cover the pot with the lid
  3. When you hear the corn pop, add the ⅓ cup of corn kernels and close the lid again.
  4. keep the flame on medium high heat and I found that if you keep swirling the pot the kernels pop evenly and won't burn.
  5. In a separate bowl, add the butter and melt in the microwave.
  6. When all the popping stops, you know it's done. remove from heat immediately or it burns
  7. Put the popcorn in a big bowl, pour the butter on and sprinkle the furikake over the mix well. You need the butter to help the furikake stick to the popcorn.
  8. If you're going to add the arare, add just before eating.

 

2 thoughts on “Hawaiian Style Popcorn – Hurricane Popcorn Recipe”

  1. Hi Jen,
    Thanks for the great idea. I’ve been making my own popcorn for some time now and didn’t think to add Furikake. We always have a bottle or 2 of Furikake on hand and my (grown) kids put it on anything they can!
    I like to shake the pot while they’re popping. Got furikake popcorn on my mind now…
    Marie

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